city of God and the politics of crisis
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city of God and the politics of crisis

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Published by Oxford University Press in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementEdgar H. Brookes.
The Physical Object
Pagination111p.,19cm
Number of Pages111
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17213732M

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The city of God and the politics of crisis. [Edgar Harry Brookes] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for The inspiration for this book was the predicament of the Union of South Africa, the author's own country. The City of God and the Politics of Crisis | Edgar H. Brookes, Publisher: Oxford University Press ()ISBN: N/ACondition: Very good. Small stain to front of DJ, and DJ has been price-clipped. Previous bookseller's label fixed to front pastedown. Text is clean and clear, a well bound g: Hardcover with DJPages: Dimensions: x x cmSKU: IZWeight: kgPrice: R Let this highly-acclaimed classic show you the roots of the Catholic crisis and explain the steps you can take to defend the Faith against those who would subvert or destroy it. When Trojan Horse in the City of God is the principal defense of conservative Catholicism and an indictment of . On the city of God against the pagans (Latin: Dē cīvitāte Deī contrā pāgānōs), often called The City of God, is a book of Christian philosophy written in Latin by Augustine of Hippo in the early 5th century book was in response to allegations that Christianity brought about the decline of Rome and is considered one of Augustine's most important works, standing alongside The Author: Augustine of Hippo.

Buy The City of God and the Politics of Crisis from The inspiration for this book was the predicament of the Union of South Africa, the author’s own country. Based on his study of St. Augustine’s De Civitate Dei, Brookes has written a book neither wholly theological nor wholly political, considering not South Africa alone, but the world and the individual as well.. Price: $ Classic book. The City of God is one of the greatest Philosophical texts out there. It is an excellent book and a read that you will find to improve your own thinking in the process. I will give one word of CAUTION, however. The translation in this book is from Reviews: Hezekiah sees that the crisis is beyond politics, since the Assyrians have impugned God. There is a limit to politics, and thus of all human intentionality. The final section is a discussion of “miracle” which establishes how God can be sovereign without diminishing . No book except the Bible itself had a greater influence on the Middle Ages than Augustine's City of since medieval Europe was the cradle of modern Western society, this work is vital for understanding our world and how it came into being/5().

Experiencing God in Times of Crisis From the series Finding God When You Need Him Most Crises are a part of life. Some are global - tsunamis, earthquakes, or terrorism. Others are local - cancer, divorce, bankruptcy, or the death of a loved one.   “City of God,” Part 1 – The Pagan Gods and Earthly Happiness, Book 5 – Providence and the Greatness of Rome [Note: My copy of “City of God” is not a complete one. The publishers and translators, in order to keep the size of the book down and keep the content more focused, edited out certain chapters where Augustine would go on one. A just political society would respect the dignity of each individual, as when he compares a just city to a well-constructed sermon: "for each single human being, like one letter in a sermon, is as it were the element of a city or kingdom, however wide is the occupation of land" (City of God, ). Augustine was enough of a realist to.   The city of Rome had long since lost its political and economic significance for the Empire, but it still held a great symbolic and psychological importance; Rome was ‘the Eternal City’, ‘Coeval with the universe and secure while the laws of nature held.’ 6 Its sack sent shockwaves rippling throughout the Empire, and as often happens in.